Composition and theory help

Discussion in 'Music Composing' started by Tugh34, Nov 3, 2017.

?

what kind of music do you like to make/listen to?

  1. Classic

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  2. Rock

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  3. Jazz

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  4. Country

    0 vote(s)
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  5. Pop

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  6. Other

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  1. Tugh34

    Tugh34

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    I figured that the Music composition forum needed a thread for Composition help and collab. But it didn't have one... So, that's why I'm making this.

    So that all you spry young folks can more easily collaborate on music projects, as well as ask for advice from more experienced musicians.

    Like this question for example. WHAT IS A GERMAN 6/5 CHORD, I'VE HEARD ABOUT IT, BUT NO MATTER WHERE I LOOK I CAN'T FIND ANY INFORMATION ON HOW TO APPROACH OR LEAVE IT.
    *ahem* Anyways, I'll be watching this thread for questions y'all have about theory in composition, and I'll be asking a few myself.
     
  2. Denian

    Denian Web Developer Staff Member Administrator Halloween VIP Dark Green VIP Black VIP Young Knight Seasoned Adventurer

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    Tugh34 likes this.
  3. Tugh34

    Tugh34

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  4. Denian

    Denian Web Developer Staff Member Administrator Halloween VIP Dark Green VIP Black VIP Young Knight Seasoned Adventurer

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    http://musictheoryblog.blogspot.de/2008/02/augmented-sixth-chords.html does. Sorry, I really don't mean to troll, but... this is stuff google can tell you within 2 minutes. My approach to making music is "drag the notes until it sounds right", so... sorry, won't be much help here.
     
  5. Tugh34

    Tugh34

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    It's fair, in all honestly I do know how to approach and leave a german 6 5, it's just really hard to find a full explanation of it online. All the wiki tells you is how the chord is built, and it assumes you know about tendency tones and all that fancy stuff. You approach a german 6 5 from a I 6 chord and leave in a V 6 chord to avoid parallel fifths. ( I believe)
     
  6. Denian

    Denian Web Developer Staff Member Administrator Halloween VIP Dark Green VIP Black VIP Young Knight Seasoned Adventurer

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    No idea what you're talking about. I have exactly one song I want to get done, and that'll be the only music I create on my own.
     
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  7. StimpyHG

    StimpyHG Adventurer Adventurer

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    You could play something in C minor or C major and use the German 6th as a V7 to C# major or C# minor. Then G7 back to C major or C minor. (Non-traditional this way but could be good for hinting a key change to C# in the future.)

    Alternatively you could convince the listener that you're in the key of Ab major, then at some point play the German 6th starting on Ab (A♭–C–E♭–F♯ for C major or C minor) and play a C major or C minor, then a V and then your new I. So i guess something like:
    Ab - Eb - Ab - Ab7(German 6th) - C 2nd inv - G - C
    The example on wiki is nice for the last 4 chords from above, just finish with chord I: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GermanSixth64.png

    I guess in this case I'm using the chord to change the direction or feel of a piece by doing slight modulations. Otherwise, I would use it as an extended version of V - I, a kind of ultimate feeling of resolution with tension initially started by the Aug 6th interval. Normally ii - V - I is good too, but the German 6th in place of ii has a real Classical sound to it.
    Did you see the variant just below the German 6th on the wiki page? The 4♭67♯2; (F–A♭–B–D♯) Australian Sixth. That one sounds real nice.
     
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  8. Tugh34

    Tugh34

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    I didn't get the chance to look at the australian sixth chord, but I've checked out the French(?) 6, and sounds good too.